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From Our Founder

The death of the office romance

By November 10, 2020September 22nd, 2021No Comments

COVID-19 has completely transformed the way that we work as individuals, including the way that we communicate, interact and operate as a team. We have shifted, in the last eight months, from working remotely with no other option to now demanding the flexible working arrangements and pushing for our own individual remote-work-preferences. It is most likely going to be this way for a very long time.

This new way of working comes with a lot of challenges for organisations all over the world who want to sustain their levels of productivity and keep their teams connected. And amid all of this, what is to come of the office romance?

As the founder of a marketing business, I know that the more you see something, the more you like it. Just as with display advertising, content marketing, sponsorship and billboards, so it is with potential partners: the more you see it, the more familiar it seems, the more you appreciate it and the more you like it. Even advertisements you hate at first, you start warming to after a while. It is an essential ingredient in branding, and in potential partners growing in their attraction.

That’s why over 25 per cent of people meet their spouses at work. Without being in the same office space and seeing each other regularly, how will the office romance continue to blossom?

It is the reality that more people meet their spouse at work than any other source, including online and through friends.

The principal of “the more you see something the more you like it” is simple psychology and I use it to explain marketing to my clients on a regular basis. It is an exceptional demonstration of how marketing, although sometimes confusing and technical and experimental, hinges on simple human behaviours.

When it comes to marketing, people are more likely to buy a product or service from someone they trust. People who fall in love with a co-worker will tell you it happened because they were attracted to them and they made them “feel something”. It is the same with marketing. It is all about likability, human connection and trust.

With the rise in remote work, I’m not only worried that 25 per cent of us will suddenly be stripped of our chance to meet the person of our dreams at the office, I’m also concerned that my favourite business analogy is becoming obsolete.

Either way the future could be grim.